Halloween Dangers

Halloween can be a time of peril for dogs and cats, according to the the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control. Most people think of chocolate when they think of dangers for pets at this time of year, but Halloween has many other potential hazards for you dog or cat. Between the excitement of the holiday, the temptation of candy and Halloween decorations, and the stress of seeing loved ones in odd, sometimes scary costumes, dogs and cats can be in some danger. Here are some tips for ensuring their safety this season.

Chocolate, the deadly candy

Chocolate is very toxic to pets. They can’t metabolize the chemicals in chocolate like humans. Unfortunately, many dogs are tempted by chocolate. They like the smell and taste. The amount of chocolate that is toxic varies depending on the type of chocolate (dark is the most dangerous) and the size of the pet. However, it’s best never to take chances. Keep chocolate out of reach from all your pets, and work with your little ones to ensure humans are the only ones who share in the Halloween bounty.

Candy in general

Pets love tasty treats and will eat as much as they can if given the opportunity. Eating large amounts of high sugar or high fat foods like candy can lead to pancreatitis, a potentially fatal and very painful inflammation of the pancreas. Just like chocolate, all candy should be kept out of your pet’s reach.

Grapes & raisins are poisonous, too

Some people offer healthy snacks, like raisins, to trick-or-treaters. These are very poisonous to dogs and to cats as well. They deserve the same caution and care that Halloween candy receives. Keep them out of your pet’s reach.

Candy wrappers

Let’s face it, if pets eat the candy, they’re not going to unwrap it. Even if they don’t get sick from the candy, those wrappers can cause a life-threatening bowel obstruction. Let’s be on the safe side and throw those wrappers away where pets can’t get at them.

Glow sticks and glow jewelry

Pets, cats in particular, love to chew on these items. While not usually life-threatening, their contents can cause pain and irritation in the mouth, as well as profuse drooling and foaming at the mouth.

Candles

Keep candles out of the reach of curious noses and wagging tails. Sometimes pets don’t realize something is hot until they get burned.

Open Doors

As trick-or-treaters come to the door, your pet could be frightened by the costumes or just the people in general. To avoid any pet making a mad dash for the door, consider keeping your pet crated or contained to a room where access to the door is not available. And just in case of emergencies, make sure your pet’s tags are up-to-date and on. 

What to Do if Your Pet Has Eaten Something Dangerous

During this Halloween season, help keep your pet safe. If you think your pet has ingested something poisonous, the veterinarians at Pet Poison Helpline suggest that you get help sooner than later. It’s always easier, less expensive, and safer for your pet to be treated earlier, versus when he’s showing severe symptoms. Contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control immediately at 1-888-426-4435.

Special Thanks to the Kentucky Humane Society for this information!!!